What Is Parallel Parenting?

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December 14, 2022 by Marjorie R. Rogers, MA (English), Certified Consultant

While the term “parallel parenting” is not yet recognized in family law, it is a growing trend among divorced or separated parents. Parallel parenting is an arrangement in which each parent takes on the majority of the child-rearing responsibilities for their own children, without much interference from the other parent. This type of arrangement often works best when there is little to no communication between the two parents.

There are several benefits to parallel parenting. First, it can provide stability for children who may feel caught in the middle of their parents’ conflict. Second, it can allow each parent to focus on their own relationship with their child, without worrying about what the other parent is doing.

Finally, it can give both parents a sense of control over their own lives and schedules. Of course, parallel parenting is not right for every situation. In some cases, such as when there are serious concerns about one parent’s ability to care for their child, it may not be possible to maintain this type of arrangement.

If you are considering parallel parenting, it’s important to discuss your options with a qualified family law attorney to ensure that it’s the best solution for your particular situation.

In parallel parenting, both parents make decisions about their children independently. This type of parenting is often necessary when parents are no longer together and must co-parent from separate homes. While it can be challenging to coordinate schedules and communication, parallel parenting allows each parent to have a say in the decisions made about their children.

When done effectively, this type of parenting can provide stability and support for children during a time of transition.

What is Parallel Parenting (Part 2) Co-Parenting – Goodman Factory Podcast

Parallel Parenting Examples

There are many different ways to parallel parent, but some common examples include creating and following a parenting schedule, communicating with each other through a third party or co-parenting app, and making decisions together about major life events affecting your children. When it comes to creating a parenting schedule, there are a few things you’ll need to consider. First, think about what times of day each parent is available and when the children will be in school or daycare.

Next, decide how much time each parent will spend with the children on weekdays, weekends, and holidays. Finally, come up with a plan for sharing transportation duties so that both parents can have time with the kids without having to coordinate schedules too closely. Once you have a basic parenting schedule in place, communication is key to making it work.

You’ll need to be able to communicate with each other about changes or deviations from the schedule as well as any issues that arise. A third party such as a therapist or lawyer can help facilitate these conversations if needed. In addition, using a co-parenting app can help keep everyone on track by providing a shared calendar and messaging platform.

Finally, it’s important to make decisions together about major life events affecting your children. This might include things like starting school or extracurricular activities, changing residences, or dealing with medical issues. By working together and being respectful of each other’s input, you can make sure that these transitions go smoothly for your kids.

What Is Parallel Parenting?

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Is Parallel Parenting Healthy?

There is no one answer to this question as it depends on each individual situation. Some parents find that parallel parenting works well for them and their children, while others may find it to be more challenging. Ultimately, what is most important is that the parents are able to communicate and cooperate with each other in order to make decisions that are in the best interest of their children.

Parallel parenting can be defined as a parenting arrangement where both parents have equal responsibility for their children even though they live in separate households. This type of arrangement often occurs after divorce or separation. In some cases, parallel parenting may also be used when there are concerns about one parent’s ability to care for their child (such as if there are substance abuse issues).

There are both benefits and challenges associated with parallel parenting. One benefit is that it allows both parents to have an active role in their child’s life. This can be beneficial for the child as they still get to spend time with both of their parents even if they don’t live in the same household.

Another benefit is that it can help reduce conflict between the parents since they are not living in the same house and therefore don’t have to deal with each other on a daily basis. One challenge of parallel parenting is that it can be difficult to coordinate schedules between two households. This can be especially challenging if the parents live far apart from each other.

Another challenge is that parallel parenting requires good communication and cooperation between the parents in order to make decisions about their child’s upbringing (such as what school they will attend or what extracurricular activities they will participate in). If the Parents are unable to effectively communicate with each other, this can lead to disagreements which can be stressful for both the Parents and the child.

Is Parallel Parenting Good for Kids?

There are a lot of heated debates on the internet about whether or not parallel parenting is good for kids. Some parents swear by it, while others claim it’s detrimental to children’s development. So, what’s the truth?

Is parallel parenting actually good for kids? The answer may surprise you. While there are certainly some benefits to parallel parenting, there are also some potential drawbacks that you should be aware of before making the decision to pursue this type of arrangement.

Here’s a closer look at both sides of the issue: Benefits of Parallel Parenting 1. It Can Help Kids Adjust to Divorce

For many kids, divorce is a major adjustment. In addition to dealing with the loss of their family unit, they also have to learn how to navigate two separate households and schedules. Parallel parenting can help make this transition easier by providing stability and routine in each home.

Additionally, because communication between parents is limited, kids don’t have to worry about being caught in the middle of any conflict. This can help reduce stress and anxiety during an already difficult time. 2. It Can Encourage Independence

In a traditional co-parenting arrangement, one parent typically takes on more of the child-rearing responsibilities than the other. This can lead to feelings of dependency in children who may come to rely heavily on one parent for love and support. With parallel parenting, however, each parent has their own set of rules and expectations that children must follow.

This can encourage independence and self-sufficiency from an early age.

What Does Parallel Parent Mean?

Assuming you are asking about the term parallel parenting: Parallel parenting is a parenting arrangement in which divorced or separated parents act as independent single parents rather than working together to co-parent their children. In a parallel parenting arrangement, each parent has primary responsibility for their own children and household, and communication between households is typically limited to logistics regarding the children’s schedules and activities.

Parallel parenting is often contrasted with cooperative or shared parenting, in which divorced or separated parents work together to co-parent their children. There are several advantages of parallel parenting arrangements. First, because each parent has primary responsibility for their own children and household, there is less opportunity for conflict between households.

Second, parallel parenting can provide stability for children by minimizing contact between households and reducing opportunities for parental conflict. Third, because each parent has primary responsibility for their own household, they are more likely to have the time and energy to devote to meeting the needs of their children. Finally, parallel parenting can allow both parents to maintain separate lives outside of the family unit, which can be beneficial for both parents and children.

There are also some disadvantages of parallel parenting arrangements. First, because communication between households is typically limited, it can be difficult to coordinate schedules and make sure that everyone is on the same page regarding important decisions affecting the children. Second, if one parent fails to meet their responsibilities (e.g., fails to pick up the child from school), this can cause disruptions in the other parent’s household as well as in the child’s life.

Third, if one parent moves out of state or otherwise becomes unavailable, it can be difficult for the other parent to maintain contact with them and ensure that they are meeting their parental responsibilities.

What is Parallel Parenting With a Narcissist?

If you have children with a narcissist, you may be wondering what parallel parenting is and how it can help you coparent effectively. Parallel parenting is a term that is used to describe a parenting arrangement in which the parents have little or no contact with each other and make decisions about their children separately. This type of arrangement can be necessary when the parents are unable to communicate or cooperate with each other.

There are several benefits to parallel parenting. It can allow the parents to avoid conflict, keep communication to a minimum, and focus on co-parenting their children effectively. In some cases, it may also be necessary to protect one parent from the other parent’s narcissistic behavior.

If you are considering parallel parenting, it’s important to consult with an attorney or therapist who can help you create a plan that will work best for your family.

Conclusion

When parents divorce, they often have to negotiate a parenting plan that establishes rules and expectations for how they will raise their children together. Parallel parenting is one type of parenting arrangement in which the parents live in separate households and have little or no contact with each other. This type of arrangement can be beneficial for families who have high conflict or are unable to communicate effectively.

About Author (Marjorie R. Rogers)

The inspiring mum of 6 who dedicates her time to supporting others. While battling with her own demons she continues to be the voice for others unable to speak out. Mental illness almost destroyed her, yet here she is fighting back and teaching you all the things she has learned along the way. Get Started To Read …